All posts tagged: emotional health

more time…please.

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emotional health / human experience / Uncategorized

    See that?  Even these old rusted out cars aren’t alone.  Wonder where they were headed?   Seems I read about them travelling somewhere in Asia.  An earthquake hit and everyone who was able, evacuated their cars and walked to safety.  No one ever retrieved their cars as the road was no longer useable. Cars all crushed and mangled together.  It’s been many years since.  Vehicles as far as the eye can see. This is prompting me to think way more deeply than […]

I Am…Both/And

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emotional health / human experience / Uncategorized

Now that’s a concept “Both/And”….What the “F” am I talking about?  (I refuse to use the f word in this blog as I am talking, in part, about my dream guy, who just happens to be a Franciscan Priest for Christ’s sake.  That wasn’t a swear word either as I meant it quite literally.  Geez…) In Richard Rohr’s amazing book, Falling Upward, he speaks about “Dualistic Thinking”.  Much as the term “Manage My Now” in my last […]

~ Please Hear What I’m Not Saying ~

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emotional health / emotional scar tissue / human experience / mental health / Uncategorized

How very appropriate, I’m thinking to myself as I self-soothe with another bite of my (forbidden) bagel with berry cream cheese.  It’s raining…tears.  From Heaven, right?  How cliché.  Do you know how many articles I’ve scanned, Facebook posts I’ve glanced at, Twitter commentary I’ve witnessed, news reports I’ve absorbed in the last 24 hours?  The news about Robin Williams’ “apparent suicide” resonates everywhere.  People relating to his disease, the major depression, that exhausted him completely as well as the drug […]

Complicated Grief is, well…complicated…

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emotional health / human experience / mental health / Uncategorized

According to Wikipedia, Complicated Grief Disorder (CGD) is a proposed disorder for those who are significantly and functionally impaired by prolonged grief symptoms for at least one month after six months of bereavement. (1)  It is distinguished from non-impairing grief (2) and other disorders.  It has been placed in the “lets take a closer look” bin by DSM-5 work groups (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition) who have decided that it be called […]